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#22 Love Enough


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#22 Love Enough



Bookmark #22 Toronto, Ontario

Love Enough, by Dionne Brand


The woman is brooding, so he is quiet. Every six months there’s an inspection on this car, he has to do this to keep the plates, then there’s the gas, then there’s the other driver, who is always crying about money as if Da’uud doesn’t have enough children of his own. Of course this is not what he would have done if there was any other way but there was no sense thinking about that. The heart is sore. Before you know it you’ve been driving a cab for ten years. The cab flies along the lake at the south of the city to Sunnyside.

“Where in Sunnyside?” he says when they are near to Parkside Drive.

“Just here,” the passenger says.

— from LOVE ENOUGH by Dionne Brand, published by Alfred A. Knopf Canada, a division of Random House Canada. Bookmarked at Toronto on December 8, 2018.


 Watch the  TRAILER  for our special exhibit!

Watch the TRAILER for our special exhibit!

 Visit the  EXHIBIT  – Dionne Brand READING and INTERVIEWS

Visit the EXHIBIT – Dionne Brand READING and INTERVIEWS

 

Project Bookmark Canada is honoured to add Dionne Brand’s Love Enough to Canada’s Literary Trail. A recipient of the Order of Canada, Brand is one of this nation’s most accomplished contemporary writers. 

“From our acclaimed poet and novelist: a gem of a novel that sizzles about love — between lovers, between friends, and for the places we live in — and pays homage to each moment of experience.”
Love Enough Publisher, Vintage Canada

Visit the enhanced audio and visual exhibit for Love Enough, created by artist duo Accounts & Records, featuring interviews with and a reading by  Dionne Brand. 

Thanks to the Toronto Arts Council, the Ontario Arts Council, and our individual donors for their support in building this Bookmark.


About Dionne Brand and Love Enough

Dionne Brand’s literary credentials are legion. Her poetry has won the Griffin Poetry Prize, the Governor General's Literary Award, the Trillium Book Award and the Pat Lowther Memorial Award. Her novels have also won much acclaim, including the Toronto Book Award. Dionne Brand served as Toronto's Poet Laureate from 2009 to 2012. In 2017, she was named to the Order of Canada. She lives in Toronto.

Love Enough was originally published by Alfred A. Knopf Canada, a division of Random House of Canada, in 2014. This excerpt is used with the kind permission of the author.

 Photo credit: Jason Chow.

Photo credit: Jason Chow.


The Passage:

“In this city you have to keep your belongings with you,” Da’uud tells this to a woman in his taxi. He tells her everything about the boy and everything about himself; how he was an economist, how he trained in Switzerland in 1978. How many languages he speaks, Italian, English, Arabic, French, Somali. How he went back home and how in 1994 he fled. The whole country fell apart under the men who knew everything. The military men, the religious men. The hard men. “You’ve heard this story?” he asks her. “Before you know it, you’re trapped. Five languages, Miss. Five.”

She is looking out the window along the lakeshore. “No, that’s terrible,” she says.
Why do men force their lives on me, she thinks.

“Yes, terrible,” he says. “So I tell him all this. He doesn’t care. He can’t understand.”

“Hmm,” she says.

Da’uud picked her up on Eastern Avenue and he’s driving her along the lake as it wanders in and out from view. “So where are you going, Miss?”

“Nowhere, really,” she says. She’s vague. But the man she is meeting has told her she is beautiful.

 “No, Miss, I mean the address. Where you call the taxi for to go.” He drives past the island airport with this red-haired passenger. Does it matter who he was before this? No, it doesn’t.

The day he stepped into this cab it ceased to matter who he was. The day he set foot in this cab his life, so to speak, changed.

“Sunnyside,” the passenger says.

“Sunnyside,” he repeats. “Sunnyside,” he repeats again. The woman is brooding, so he is quiet. Every six months there’s an inspection on this car, he has to do this to keep the plates, then there’s the gas, then there’s the other driver, who is always crying about money as if Da’uud doesn’t have enough children of his own. Of course this is not what he would have done if there was any other way but there was no sense thinking about that. The heart is sore. Before you know it you’ve been driving a cab for ten years. The cab flies along the lake at the south of the city to Sunnyside. 

“Where in Sunnyside?” he says when they are near to Parkside Drive.

“Just here,” the passenger says.

“Here?” 

“Yes, here. The parking lot,” she says.

He pulls into the parking lot. There are geese crossing the lot going toward the lake. Da’uud waits, the geese cross. He wishes he could come out of this cab and walk with the woman. She pays him, he sighs. It would change his life again to go walk with her. She waves to a man near a statue. Da’uud glimpses the man’s face. He doesn’t like it, it tears a sliver in his chest. He thinks, that man can kill someone. He has seen the faces of people who can kill people. The woman flutters toward the man. Da’uud leaves, saying to himself maybe he’s wrong, the things he knows are not useful. None of the things he knows has helped him to recover Bedri as a son, an obedient son whose life would redeem the choices a father makes.

 
 
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Banner photo credit: Toronto Lakeshore, Laurie Murphy. 


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#21 The Gable Window


#21 The Gable Window



Bookmark #21 Cavendish, Prince Edward Island

“The Gable Window,” by L.M. Montgomery


I looked from it o’er bloomy meadows,
     Where idle breezes lost their way,
To solemn hills, whose purple shadows
     About them lay.
I saw the sunshine stream in splendor
     O’er heaven’s utmost azure bars,
At eve the radiance, pure and tender,
     Of white-browed stars.
– from the collection The Poetry of Lucy Maud Montgomery by L.M. Montgomery, published by Fitzhenry & Whiteside. Bookmarked at Cavendish, June 24, 2018.

 David Macneill, L.M. Montgomery's cousin, and Laurie Murphy, Executive Director of Project Bookmark Canada, at The Macneill Homestead.

David Macneill, L.M. Montgomery's cousin, and Laurie Murphy, Executive Director of Project Bookmark Canada, at The Macneill Homestead.

 Summertime at The Macneill Homestead,  which has been in the same family since the 1700s.

Summertime at The Macneill Homestead,  which has been in the same family since the 1700s.

 

The first Bookmark on Prince Edward Island is for Lucy Maud Montgomery's poem, “The Gable Window,” set at The Site of L.M. Montgomery’s Cavendish Home. Dr. Elizabeth Epperly, in consultation with Jennie Macneill, suggested the poem to Project Bookmark Canada as ideal for a Bookmark. “There are so many lush and beautiful passages describing the Macneill place in the Anne and indeed Emily books,” wrote Epperly, “And right there is where the Montgomery fan experiences that ‘I know this place’ feeling and a sense of awe.” 

“‘Place’ figures prominently in Montgomery's work, and how appropriate that a tangible recognition of her work is placed at the site of the Macneill Homestead in Cavendish, so foundational for Montgomery's development and work," wrote Dr. Philip Smith, UPEI Psychology, and Chair, L.M. Montgomery Institute Committee, UPEI.

Kate Macdonald Butler, President of the Heirs of L.M. Montgomery (Inc.), supports the Cavendish Bookmark: "The Heirs of L.M. Montgomery are delighted that the first official Bookmark on Prince Edward Island honours L.M. Montgomery, on the Macneill site in Cavendish she loved so much." 


About L.M. Montgomery and “The Gable Window”

Lucy Maud Montgomery (November 30, 1874 – April 24, 1942) is a cherished Canadian author admired by readers around the world. She published 20 novels as well as more than 500 short stories, 500 poems, and numerous essays. Her works have been translated into over 35 languages, and she was made an officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1935.

“The Gable Window” was first published in The Ladies Journal in 1897, when Montgomery was 23 years old. It was republished almost 100 years later in 1987 in The Poetry of Lucy Maud Montgomery by Fitzhenry & Whiteside. The poem is set in the Macneill Homestead, where L.M. Montgomery wrote hundreds of short stories and poems, in addition to Anne of Green Gables and three other novels.

This Bookmark is endorsed by the L.M. Montgomery Institute at the University of Prince Edward Island, the Heirs of L.M. Montgomery, and The Site of Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Cavendish Home. L.M. Montgomery is a trademark of Heirs of L.M. Montgomery Inc.

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Banner photo: The Macneill Homestead, by Laurie Murphy. 


The Poem:

The Gable Window
It opened on a world of wonder,
     When summer days were sweet and long,
A world of light, a world of splendor,
     A world of song.
‘Twas there I passed my hours of dreaming,
     ‘Twas there I knelt at night to pray;
And, when the rose-lit dawn was streaming
     Across the day,
I bent from it to catch the glory
     Of all those radiant silver skies –
A resurrection allegory
     For human eyes!
The summer raindrops on it beating,
     The swallows clinging ‘neath the eaves,
The wayward shadows by it fleeting,
     The whispering leaves;
The birds that passed in joyous vagrance,
     The echoes of the golden moon,
The drifting in of subtle fragrance,
     The wind’s low croon;
Held each a message and a token
     In every hour of day and night;
A meaning wordless and unspoken,
     Yet read aright.
I looked from it o’er bloomy meadows,
     Where idle breezes lost their way,
To solemn hills, whose purple shadows
     About them lay.
I saw the sunshine stream in splendor
     O’er heaven’s utmost azure bars,
At eve the radiance, pure and tender,
     Of white-browed stars.
I carried there my childish sorrows,
     I wept my little griefs away;
I pictured there my glad to-morrows
     In bright array.
The airy dreams of child and maiden
     Hang round that gable window still,
As cling the vines, green and leaf-laden,
     About the sill.
And though I lean no longer from it,
     To gaze with loving reverent eyes,
On clouds and amethystine summit,
     And star-sown skies.
The lessons at its casement taught me,
     My life with rich fruition fill;
The rapture and the peace they brought me
     Are with me still!